Effectiveness of multilateral funds


Maximising the effectiveness of climate change finance is an issue of urgency for both the climate change and development communities, focused on finding the best ways to use relatively small amounts of largely public finance to have the greatest possible impact in enabling climate compatible development. Demonstrating the effectiveness of spending on climate change is particularly important in a time of restricted public budgets and competing demands on donor governments. It is also crucial that lessons on effectiveness are taken into account in operationalising the Green Climate Fund.
 
The Overseas Development Institute (ODI) is analysing the effectiveness of major multilateral climate funds, using a common framework. This page compiles our work in the area.

 

Effectiveness framework

 
The effectiveness of international climate finance

Accompanying a series of reviews of multilateral funds, this paper considers the context of delivering climate finance and presents a guiding framework to assess the effectiveness of international climate funds.

The framework identifies ten key and interlinked dimensions that are central to understanding the effectiveness of spending and outcomes of dedicated public finance initiatives that have been established to help countries respond to climate change.
 
http://www.odi.org.uk/sites/odi.org.uk/files/styles/squarefit_230/public/odi-assets/publications-opinion-file-covers/8344.png
 

 
Multilateral fund effectiveness studies 


 

The effectiveness of climate finance: a review of the Adaptation Fund

One in a series of ODI working papers assessing the effectiveness of multilateral climate finance, this paper reviews the Adaptation Fund.

Five years after its establishment, and with the formal financial architecture of the UNFCCC under renegotiation, the moment is right to take stock of the operations and achievements of the Adaptation Fund. This paper reflects on the effectiveness of the Adaptation Fund with consideration for the processes by which it spends money, and the likely outcomes of the funding that has been delivered.
 

http://www.odi.org.uk/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/8341.pdf


 The effectiveness of climate finance: a review of the Amazon Fund

This working paper is the second in  a series of studies of the effectiveness of dedicated climate funds. This paper reviews the Amazon Fund in Brazil.

Four years after the operationalisation of the fund, and with the emergence of a portfolio of supported projects, it is useful to reflect on its achievements in practice.
 

http://www.odi.org.uk/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/8340.pdf


 The effectiveness of climate finance: a review of the Clean Technology Fund 

The third in a series of ODI working papers assessing the effectiveness of multilateral climate finance; this paper reviews the Clean Technology Fund.

The experience of the CTF offers important insights into what it takes to use diverse financial instruments at scale to support developing countries to respond to climate change. Its experience reinforces the importance of country context for programmes, and of due attention to issues of institutional capacity and preparedness. 
 

http://www.odi.org.uk/sites/odi.org.uk/files/styles/squarefit_230/public/odi-assets/publications-opinion-file-covers/8643.png
 

The effectiveness of climate finance: a review of the Global Environment Facility

The fourth in a series of ODI working papers assessing the effectiveness of multilateral climate finance; this paper reviews the Global Environment Facility. 

The GEF has grappled with many of the questions that confront the international community as it confronts the question of how to design and operate effective international climate funds. It is timely to take stock of its evolving priorities and areas of focus. 
 

http://www.odi.org.uk/sites/odi.org.uk/files/styles/squarefit_230/public/odi-assets/publications-opinion-file-covers/8632.png






      
    





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